San Jose: Children’s Day

Kodomo no HiKodomo no Hi

April 28, 2013 | 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Japanese American Museum of San Jose

Come celebrate our children at this traditional Japanese holiday event, featuring special craft activities for boys and girls.

Although traditionally celebrated on May 5th, our event is held early to coincide with Japantown’s Nikkei Matsuri.

Brightly dyed carp streamers will soon be fluttering above houses in Japan and many Japanese American homes during the celebration of Kodomo No Hi. In keeping with this tradition, koi streamers will be hung along 5th Street, leading you to JAMsj during the Nikkei Matsuri Festival. [http://www.nikkeimatsuri.org]

Kodomo No Hi, otherwise known as Children’s Day, is a nationally observed holiday in Japan, traditionally celebrated on May 5.

JAMsj will be celebrating Kodomo No Hi with various craft-making workshops. Children can learn how to make kabuto (samurai helmets), koinobori (carp streamers), and other crafts at this popular event.

Hello Kitty will also be making a special appearance at the museum and at JAMsj’s festival booth. For a small fee, we’ll give you a special Hello Kitty crown or fan and take a special photo of yourself with Hello Kitty.

We’ll also raffle off a special JAMsj gift basket.

Cost: Free with admission to the museum (non-members, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free). An additional materials fee may apply.

For more information, please email PublicPrograms@JAMsj.org or call the JAMsj office at (408) 294-31389.

C I T I N E R A R I E S | FESTIVAL: Hina Matsuri

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